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Nea and Susan :) A Success Story

By | Dog Blog, Testimonials, Uncategorized | No Comments
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‎Neakita

I just had to share this wonderful picture and story with you. Nea and I went with Carolyn and Djibril to Puppy Mugs at UALR on Saturday after training. I was very proud of Nea and the staff there. We walked up a flight of stairs AND down the flight of stairs. Nea was terrific! She didn’t pull and was only a little nervous on the way down. She paused halfway and looked up at me!! Yahooo!! I just calmly said “good girl! You’ve got this!” And she continued down the stairs. It was a surprisingly narrow stairwell! We waited for treats until we were on solid ground. When we arrived, there was a full hallway of people and dogs. I about had a panic attack. But I remembered MY training and knew I better change my attitude quickly!! Several people nearby tried to reach for Nea to pet her. I just said please don’t, she tends to be nervous and they backed up. Thanks to Carolyn’s quick thinking, Nea and I were allowed to wait in another empty hallway that others just passed through until it was our turn. As people and their dogs steadily streamed by us, Nea just sniffed and watched. I lavished her with treats! There was only one dog that she growled at. But it was quietly, brief and the owner had stopped to talk and was not paying attention to her own dog that was in Nea’s face. This was fantastic since, as you know, Nea doesn’t usually give a warning growl. When it was our turn to have pictures, the workers asked everyone to make a path, that a nervous dog was coming through. Then I told Nea, “with me” and walked my Queen of the world walk straight through the crowded hallway. Shoulders back, head up. People and dogs on both sides. Not one bark. Not one tug on the leash! We Rocked the Walk!! And look how relaxed she looks in the picture!! She sat and stayed for pictures and down stayed for more! Notice the leash laying flat on the ground! She wasn’t startled by the flashes but did want to investigate. The photographer did a few practice flashes and took the time to let Nea look through the room before we got started. And then walked back through the crowd like a champion!! I was so very proud of her!! And the staff was made up of students!!! Not professionals! They were so fantastic!

Thank you for all you have taught us!! Without you, this awesome Puppy Mug survival story wouldn’t be possible!!

Sincerely Amazed and Thankful!!

~Susan and Neakita

Breed Specific Legislation – Effective? Statistically Absolutely Not!

By | Continuing Education, Dog Blog, Uncategorized | No Comments

http://www.aspcapro.org/resource/disaster-cruelty-animal-cruelty-animal-fighting/are-breed-specific-laws-effective

 

Are Breed-Specific Laws EffectiveEmail this page

Dealing with Reckless Owners and Dangerous Dogs in Your Community

Dogs permitted by their owners to run loose, and dogs who attack people or other animals, are real and often serious problems in communities across the country; but how to best address dangerous and potentially dangerous dogs can be a confusing and touchy issue.

“Breed-specific” legislation (BSL) is the blanket term for laws that either regulate or ban certain breeds completely in the hopes of reducing dog attacks. Some city/municipal governments have enacted breed-specific laws, as has the State of Ohio. However, the problem of dangerous dogs will not be remedied by the “quick fix” of breed-specific laws, or, as they should truly be called, breed-discriminatory laws.

It is worth noting that in some areas, regulated breeds include not just American Pit Bull terriers, American Staffordshire terriers, Staffordshire bull terriers, English bull terriers and Rottweilers, but also a variety of other dogs, including American bulldogs, mastiffs, Dalmatians, chow chows, German shepherds, Doberman pinschers, or any mix of these breeds – and dogs who simply resemble these breeds. On the bright side, many states (including New York, Texas and Illinois) favor laws that identify, track and regulate dangerous dogs individually, regardless of breed, and prohibit BSL.

Are Breed-Specific Laws Effective?

There is no evidence that breed-specific laws, which are costly and difficult to enforce, make communities safer for people or companion animals. For example, Prince George’s County, MD, spends more than $250,000 annually to enforce its ban on pit bulls. In 2003, a study conducted by the county on the ban’s effectiveness noted that “public safety is not improved as a result of [the ban],” and that “there is no transgression committed by owner or animal that is not covered by another, non-breed specific portion of the Animal Control Code (i.e., vicious animal, nuisance animal, leash laws).”

Following a thorough study of human fatalities resulting from dog bites, the United States Centers for Disease Control (CDC) decided not to support BSL. The CDC cited, among other problems, the inaccuracy of dog bite data and the difficulty in identifying dog breeds (especially true of mixed-breed dogs). The CDC also noted the likelihood that as certain breeds are regulated, those who exploit dogs by making them aggressive will replace them with other, unregulated breeds.

What’s Wrong with Breed-Specific Laws?

BSL carries a host of negative and wholly unintended consequences:

  • Dogs go into hiding
    Rather than give up their beloved pets, owners of highly regulated or banned breeds often attempt to avoid detection of their “outlaw” dogs by restricting outdoor exercise and socialization and forgoing licensing, microchipping, and proper veterinary care, including spay/neuter surgery and essential vaccinations. Such actions have implications both for public safety and the health of these dogs.
  • Good owners and dogs are punished
    BSL also causes hardship to responsible owners of entirely friendly, properly supervised, and well-socialized dogs who happen to fall within the regulated breed. Although these dog owners have done nothing to endanger the public, they are required to comply with local breed bans and regulations unless they are able to mount successful (and often costly) legal challenges.
  • They impart a false sense of security
    Breed-specific laws have a tendency to compromise rather than enhance public safety. When limited animal control resources are used to regulate or ban a certain breed of dog, without regard to behavior, the focus is shifted away from routine, effective enforcement of laws that have the best chance of making our communities safer:

    • Dog license laws
    • Leash laws
    • Animal fighting laws
    • Anti-tethering laws
    • Laws facilitating spaying and neutering
    • Laws that require all owners to control their dogs, regardless of breed
  • They may actually encourage ownership by irresponsible people
    If you outlaw a breed, then outlaws are attracted to that breed. Unfortunately some people take advantage of the “outlaw” status of their breed of choice to bolster their own self image as living outside of the rules of mainstream society. Ironically, the rise of pit bull ownership among gang members and others in the late 1980’s coincided with the first round of breed-specific legislation.

What’s the Alternative to Breed-Specific Laws?

In the aforementioned study, the CDC noted that many other factors beyond breed may affect a dog’s tendency toward aggression—things such as heredity, sex, early experience, reproductive status, socialization, and training. These last two concerns are well-founded, given that:

  • More than 70 percent of all dog bite cases involve unneutered male dogs.
  • An unneutered male dog is 2.6 times more likely to bite than is a neutered dog.
  • A chained or tethered dog is 2.8 times more likely to bite than a dog who is not chained or tethered.
  • 97 percent of dogs involved in fatal dog attacks in 2006 were not spayed/neutered.
  • 78 percent were maintained not as pets, but rather for guarding, image enhancement, fighting or breeding.
  • 84 percent were maintained by reckless owners-these dogs were abused or neglected, not humanely controlled or contained, or allowed to interact with children unsupervised.

Recognizing that the problem of dangerous dogs requires serious attention, the ASPCA seeks effective enforcement of breed-neutral laws that hold dog owners accountable for the actions of their animals. For help in drafting animal control laws, contact the ASPCA’s Government Relations department.

Harley and Gabby :)

By | Continuing Education, Uncategorized | No Comments

I love success stories and I love to share them. So, in that vein, let’s talk about Gabby and Harley and their behavior reshaping. When I first met these two dogs and their “mommy” and “daddy” (human guardians), their mommy probably would have said I was crazy if I told her that there would be a day that these two dogs would walk side by side together because they were fighting quite a bit. Mommy has been very nervous and we have all worked very hard. Today I had a blast with them and they walked and played and Harley gave Gabby a big sloppy kiss on the face. They also got to practice their obedience training. They are good girls and life is better for everyone 🙂20150602_155339_resized20150602_161253_resized20150602_160536_resized20150602_161642_resized

Kids, Dogs and Discipline

By | Slideshow Tips, Uncategorized | No Comments

Although it may not be the most fun topic, proper discipline is important to address.

And while we usually prefer not to liken dogs to kids because dogs aren’t people, discipline is one area you can draw a similarity. When considering whether or not to discipline your sweet little Yorkie or even your lovable Lab for misbehaving, ask yourself these two questions:

  1. Would I let my kid get away with this?
  2. If I did, would it be good for him or her to let them get away with it?

Dogs, like children, need rules and boundaries to become well-balanced adults. The most harm you can possibly do to your dog is not setting rules, boundaries and limitations. The second worst thing you can do after that is not disciplining them for crossing those boundaries.

But, there are right ways and VERY wrong ways of disciplining your dog.

From here, drop the similarity between kids and dogs, because they need to be disciplined VERY differently. Spankings DO NOT work. Dogs don’t understand it. Would a mother-dog spank her pup for getting out of line?

Also, never, EVER call your dog to come to you to discipline them. And don’t use their name negatively like “Bad Spot!”

At See Spot Sit, we’ll teach you exactly how to discipline your dog in a humane way that they understand.

About the Author
Jamie Walden
is an experienced dog trainer and co-owner of See Spot Sit Dog Training in North Little Rock, Arkansas. Contact him at jamie.walden@ymail.com with questions or comments.